Academic Positions

  • Present 2016

    PostDoc

    Monash University, Department of Economics

  • 2016 2015

    PostDoc

    Stony Brook University, Department of Political Science

Education

  • Ph.D. 2016

    Ph.D. in Economics

    University of Nottingham

  • M.Sc.2011

    M.Sc. in Behavioural Economics

    University of Nottingham

  • Bachelor2010

    B.A. in Economics

    B.S. in Mathematics

    Shanghai Jiaotong University

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Is There No 'I' in Team? Strategic Effects in Multi-Battle Team Competition

Lu Dong, Lingbo Huang
Journal Paper Joural of Economic Psychology, forthcoming

Abstract

Individuals may respond differently to their own past performance than to their teammates' performance in a multi-battle competition. Using field data from professional squash team tournaments, we show that while previous individual success begets more success, teammates' past performance has little impact on players' immediate and overall battle performance. It could be argued that players follow the heuristic of doing their best for their teams while at the same time succumbing to a psychological momentum effect, which suggests that responses to their own previous performance depend on the full history of previous battle outcomes. Our analysis, however, cannot reject that players are motivated by a strategic momentum effect, which predicts that responses only depend on the current state of battle outcomes irrespective of its precise realization in history.

Disappointment Aversion and Social Comparisons in a Real-Effort Competition

Simon Gächter, Lingbo Huang, Martin Sefton
Journal Paper Economic Inquiry, forthcoming

Abstract

We present an experiment to investigate the source of disappointment aversion in a sequential real-effort competition. Specifically, we study the contribution of social comparison effects to the disappointment aversion previously identified in a two-person real-effort competition (Gill and Prowse, 2012). To do this we compare "social" and "asocial" versions of the Gill and Prowse experiment, where the latter treatment removes the scope for social comparisons. If disappointment aversion simply reflects an asymmetric evaluation of losses and gains we would expect it to survive in our asocial treatment. Alternatively, if losing to or winning against another person affects the evaluation of losses/gains, as we show would be theoretically the case under asymmetric inequality aversion, we would expect treatment differences. We find behavior in social and asocial treatments to be similar, suggesting that social comparisons have little impact in this setting. Unlike in Gill and Prowse we do not find evidence of disappointment aversion.

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Combining "Real Effort" with Induced Effort Costs: The Ball-Catching Task

Simon Gächter, Lingbo Huang, Martin Sefton
Journal Paper Experimental Economics, Volume 19, Issue 4, December 2016, 687-712

Abstract

We introduce the "ball-catching task", a novel computerized task, which combines a tangible action ("catching balls") with induced material cost of effort. The central feature of the ball-catching task is that it allows researchers to manipulate the cost of effort function as well as the production function, which permits quantitative predictions on effort provision. In an experiment with piece-rate incentives we find that the comparative static and the point predictions on effort provision are remarkably accurate. We also present experimental findings from three classic experiments, namely, team production, gift exchange and tournament, using the task. All of the results are closely in line with the stylized facts from experiments using purely induced values. We conclude that the ball-catching task combines the advantages of real effort tasks with the use of induced values, which is useful for theory-testing purposes as well as for applications.

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ZTREE CODE
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ONLINE DEMO

Prize and Incentives in Double-Elimination Tournaments

Lingbo Huang
Journal Paper Economics Letters, Volume 147, October 2016, Pages 116-120

Abstract

I examine a game-theoretical model of two variants of double- elimination tournaments, and derive the equilibrium behavior of symmetric players and the optimal prize allocation assuming a designer aims to maximize total effort. I compare these theoretical properties to the well-known single-elimination tournament.

An Empirical Investigation of Individual and Team Contests

Lingbo Huang
PhD Thesis University of Nottingham, January 2016

Abstract

This thesis presents an empirical investigation of individual and team contests using both lab experiments and field data. The thesis is comprised of five chapters. Chapter 1 introduces the overarching theme of this thesis and the common methodological tool, which is a novel real effort task used in the lab experiments. Chapter 2 discusses this real effort task in more detail and shows its usefulness in studying behavioural responses to incentives by presenting a series of experiments, including individual production with piece-rate incentives, team production, gift exchange, and tournament, using the task. All of the results are closely in line with theoretical predictions and, where applicable, the stylised facts from experiments using purely induced values. Chapter 3 experimentally examines the role of interpersonal comparisons in an individual contest. The experiment follows Gill and Prowse (2012) and is designed to investigate the source of disappointment aversion, that is, whether it is purely an asocial concept, akin to loss aversion, or fuelled by interpersonal comparisons. The new evidence however rejects predictions of the disappointment aversion model, both when interpersonal comparisons are possible and when they are not. Chapter 4 empirically examines strategic behaviour of contestants in a dynamic "best-of-three" team contest. I find evidence of "strategic neutrality" in both field data from high-stakes professional squash team tournaments and lab data from an experiment: the outcomes of previous battles do not affect the current battle. The lab data however reveal that the neutrality prediction does not perfectly hold at the level of individual efforts. Chapter 5 concludes the thesis by summarising all findings in previous chapters, discussing the limitations, and pointing to directions for future research.

Feedback Spillover Effects in Multitask Environments

Lingbo Huang, Zahra Murad
Working Paper

Abstract

Employees typically work on multiple tasks that require unrelated skills and abilities. While past research strongly supports that relative performance feedback influences beliefs (i.e. confidence), preferences for comparative pay and performance within same tasks, little is known about effects of relative performance feedback across different tasks. In a novel laboratory experiment using a series of pilot and main studies, we find that relative performance feedback in the first task significantly affects both beliefs and preferences in the second task. We identify and disentangle two hypotheses (informational and motivational values of feedback) to explain our results. We also find that relative performance feedback increases females' preferences for comparative pay compared to when such feedback is absent. The results have important implications for organizations to understand both the powers and the limitations of using relative performance feedback as intervention policies in the design of accounting, control and reporting systems in firms

Fighting Alone or Fighting for a Team: An Experiment of Multiple Pairwise Contests

Lingbo Huang, Zahra Murad
Working Paper

Abstract

People who compete alone may entertain different psychological motivations from those who compete for a team. Using a real-effort experiment, we examine the behavioural consequences of these psychological motivations, absent strategic interdependence and uncertainty among team members. We exploit a dynamic pairwise team contest in which strategic uncertainties among team members play a minimised role in individual rational behaviour; and we create strategically-equivalent individual contests to isolate the pure psychological effects of team situation on individual competitive behaviour. We find that behaviour in individual contests and in sterile team contests follows a psychological momentum effect in which leaders work harder than trailers. In contrast, in team contests enriched with intra-team communication, behaviour follows a neutral effect. We discuss the implications of our results for theoretical modelling of contests and practical implications for the optimal design of team incentive schemes and personnel management.

Pulling for the Team: Competition Between Political Partisans

Lingbo Huang, Peter DeScioli, Zahra Murad
Working Paper

Abstract

At every level of politics, people form groups to compete for power and resources, including political parties, special interest groups, and international coalitions. Here we use economic experiments to investigate how people balance the desire for their group's victory versus their own expenditure of effort. We design an economic tug of war in which the side that exerts greater effort wins a reward. In Experiment 1, participants compete individually or in teams, which were assigned arbitrarily. In Experiment 2, participants compete individually or in teams based on their political party, Democrats against Republicans. In both experiments, we find that people shirked on teams: Participants exerted less effort in teams than in individual competition. The results support theories about free-riding in groups, and they depart from theories about the automatic potency of partisan motives. We discuss why it is difficult for groups, including political partisans, to mobilize toward a common goal.

Social Cheating in the Classroom: A Field Experiment

Lu Dong, Lingbo Huang, Peter DeScioli, Ninghua Du
Working Paper

Abstract

We study children's cheating by conducting a field experiment in a local primary school. Children graded either their own or another student's test, and they could cheat by misreporting the overall score. Unbeknownst to them, the test-taker's original answers were recorded by carbonless copy paper. As expected, we find that children were generally more likely to cheat for themselves compared to cheating for others. To investigate cheating for others, we vary whether children graded their friend or an acquaintance and whether the grading pairs could discuss the test while grading. For the friend, children cheated little with or without discussion. For the acquaintance, they also rarely cheated without discussion; but with discussion, they cheated frequently, nearly as much as when grading themselves. We discuss implications of these findings on social cheating for theories about reciprocity and reputation.

Peer Effects in Public Support for Pigouvian Taxation

Lingbo Huang, Erte Xiao
Working Paper

Abstract

Opposition to Pigouvian taxation can be attributable to the complexity of the policy due to the delayed benefits of taxation. We examine how peer effects can impact public support for Pigouvian taxation. Our data indicate that the support rate increases significantly when tax supporters are selected to communicate with voters. Nonetheless, people left to their own devices are generally reluctant to communicate with and influence others. Among those who are willing, both tax supporters and objectors are equally likely to volunteer themselves and are equally persuasive. As a result, the overall positive peer effect disappears. These findings offer an explanation for the continuing low public support to tax policies that could improve social welfare.

Tax Liability Side Equivalence and Time Delayed Externalities

Lingbo Huang, Silvia Tiezzi, Erte Xiao
Working Paper

Abstract

Past experimental research suggests that taxes levied on the buyer side are sometimes perceived as more acceptable than equivalent taxes levied on the seller side, violating the well-known Tax Liability-Side Equivalence Principle. This paper tests whether the statutory incidence of the tax mitigates the negative impact of delayed externality on public support for Pigouvian taxation. We show that the delay effect is robust regardless of the side the tax is levied on and regardless of whether buyers display a tax shifting bias.